Meet chemistry major Megan Broussard

Written byAmanda Burleigh

"I like how 鶹ҹ is a big enough university to have a variety of programs and research, but is also small enough that you are a person — rather than a number — to your professors. I truly feel supported and that they care about my education."

Megan Broussard
Major
Chemistry
Hometown
Lafayette, La.

Where I'm From

I'm from Lafayette, La., and was drawn to 鶹ҹ for its affordability.

Where I Am

I'm doing student research on cosmochemistry.

Where I'm Going

I'm going to earn an Honors Baccalaureate Degree from 鶹ҹ, writing my thesis on the research I've completed while in school.

Chemistry major Megan Broussard was drawn to 鶹ҹ because of its accreditation and affordability. She was also drawn to the research opportunities for undergraduates on campus.

“I like how 鶹ҹ is a big enough university to have a variety of programs and research but is also small enough that you are a person — rather than a number — to your professors,” Megan explained.

Student Research Experience

Megan's currently working on research under Dr. Manavi Jadhav, who specializes in cosmochemistry.

“We are attempting to chemically separate material from a meteorite that could give insight into the formation of our solar system,” Megan explained.

Megan plans to earn an Honors Baccalaureate Degree, which requires writing an undergraduate thesis. She plans to write her thesis on her research with Dr. Jadhav.

Studying Chemistry at 鶹ҹ

Megan chose to study chemistry at 鶹ҹ because it's the "central science."

“All matter in the universe is made of atoms," she said. "A deep understanding of chemistry is also a deep understanding of everything.”

And in the Department of Chemistry, she gets personalized mentorship as she learns.

“My favorite part about the 鶹ҹ chemistry program is the professors,” she said. “So many of them are genuinely interested in their students and their futures."

"I truly feel supported and that they care about my education. I especially love how willing they are to let students join their research groups.”

Getting Involved in Chemistry

Megan currently serves as the secretary of 鶹ҹ’s Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

“My favorite part of ACS is our scientific outreach,” Megan said.

“The earlier we can introduce a love of science in a child’s life, the better. ACS performs science demos around the Lafayette area at schools and events to foster a love of science in our community.”

Megan is also one of the founders and events coordinators of the Women’s Chemist Society.

“It is important for women in STEM to support one another,” she said, “and serve as role models to girls, showing them that being scientists and engineers is possible.”

“Science is difficult, but it is through a love of science and hard work that people become scientists,” Megan said.